BeefWatch Archive

Beefwatch Archive

To read articles prior to September 2017, please visit the article archive on UNL Announce.

Harvesting, Storing and Feeding Small Grain Silage - A Producer's Perspective

Small grain annual forages are frequently utilized in Nebraska as part of a crop production system.  Annuals such as rye, triticale, oats and wheat can be harvested as silage, offering the opportunity to produce high quality forage.

Is Silage an Option for Corn Impacted by the Canal Breach?

On July 17 when the Gering-Ft. Laramie canal breached, it left over 100,000 acres of irrigated crops in eastern Wyoming and western Nebraska without water. Without irrigation water and adequate rainfall, taking the corn to full maturity and grain production, may not be the best option for the crop.

Producers with a corn crop impacted by the canal breach may want to consider making corn silage out of this year’s crop. There are several things to consider when making the decision to make silage.

Forage Quality in the Sandhills Inconsistently Estimated by Nutrition Balance Analyzer – A Review

This article is a review of the 2019 Nebraska Beef Cattle Report “Three Year Summary: Comparison of Diets Collected from Esophageally Fistulated Cows to Forage Quality Estimated from Fecal Analysis”. Bethany M. Johnston, Jay D. Jenkins, Jacki A. Musgrave, J. Travis Mulliniks, Mitchell B. Stephenson, James MacDonald and L. Aaron Stalker were collaborators on this research study and report.

Silage Pad Construction

“What material should I use for my new silage pad?” is probably a question most producers ask once a decade at most, but it is an important decision for maintaining an efficient feeding program.  Asphalt (e.g.

Crop Residue Exchange Updated and Available for Listings

The Crop Residue Exchange  continues to link cattle producers to available grazing resources. To date, a majority of the listings have been for available corn residue. Crop producers who have listed residue available for grazing in the past are encouraged to log in and update their listings on the Exchange for the upcoming fall and winter grazing season. Recent updates to the Exchange have expanded its geographical reach to include large portions of the states that surround Nebraska.

National Changes in Intensity and Type of Antimicrobials used for Metaphylaxis

A recent publication entitled Antimicrobials Used for Metaphylaxis and Implications for Product Diversification in the Animal Health Sector provides context on how metaphylaxis use in U.S. cattle feedlots has changed between 2011 and 2016.

Using Weaning Date as a Supplement Strategy

Many beef producers are preparing to wean, or at least thinking about it. After weaning and prior to winter can be one of the most economical times to improve the body condition score (BCS) of a spring-calving cow. Producers should look at weaning date within each year as a supplement strategy to put body condition back on cows before winter. If cows are thinner than normal, a producer may want to consider weaning earlier to give those cows a chance to gain body condition, especially with the younger females. Heifer and cow BCS at calving can impact subsequent rebreeding performance.

Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory Open House Highlights

Over 200 ranchers and beef industry leaders attended the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) Gudmundsen Sandhills Laboratory (GSL) 20th Annual Open House Wednesday, August 21. 

Dry Edible Beans as Livestock Feed When Hit by Drought and Hail

Dry edible beans such as pintos, great northern, and black beans are a very valuable commodity raised in western Nebraska and eastern Wyoming ranking Nebraska second, and Wyoming eighth in national dry bean production. However, hail and drought can easily reduce bean quality and the feasibility of harvest for the rigorous human consumption standards. So the question becomes, when dry edible beans are not suitable for human consumption, what options are available?

 

What are Lectins?

Harvesting Prevent-Plant Sudans and Sorghums

September has arrived so crops like sorghum-sudangrass planted on prevent-plant acres now can be harvested or grazed.  How should you do it? 

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